health

health

France sees highest number of COVID-19 patients going into hospital since April

PARIS (Reuters) – French hospitals registered 1,307 new coronavirus patients on Monday in the highest one-day increase since April 2, which saw 1,607 new patients, as the health system comes under increasing stress from a runaway infection rate.

French health ministry data showed that France now has a total of 17,784 coronavirus patients in its hospitals, compared with a record 32,292 on April 14, at the height of the March-May lockdown.

The ministry also reported 26,771 new confirmed coronavirus cases in past 24 hours, from 52,010 on Sunday. On Monday, the tally usually drops sharply because of reporting lags over the weekend.

The death toll went up by 257, taking the cumulative total since the start of the epidemic to 35,018. The number of people in intensive care units rose by 186 to 2,770.

Several regions in France have implemented emergency plans in hospitals, delaying non-essential operations to make space in ICU units for COVID-19 patients and cancelling staff holidays.

Sources told Reuters that authorities were looking at options for still tighter measures to fight COVID-19, including starting a 9 p.m. to 6 a.m curfew earlier, confining people to their homes at weekends except for essential trips, and closing non-essential shops.

(Reporting by Geert De Clercq, Editing by Franklin Paul and Alison Williams)

Source Article

Read More
health

Doctor goes clean-shaven for first time in 50 years

Dr Manoj Joshi, before and after. (SWNS)
Dr Manoj Joshi shaved his beard and moustache to raise funds for a polio. Here, before and after. (SWNS)

A doctor who shaved all his facial hair off for the first time in five decades to raise funds for a polio vaccine says his wife doesn’t recognise him.

While Dr Manoj Joshi, 68, had trimmed his beard before, he had not shaved his moustache since he was 16 years old.

Joshi’s wife said she she’d never seen him without facial hair before in the 42 years they had been married.

A member of Rotary International, a humanitarian service whose goal is to advance goodwill and peace around the world, Dr Joshi has been involved in what he calls “acts of giving” for his entire life.

Dr Manoj Joshi, before his shave. See SWNS story SWLEmoustache; A man who shaved his moustache to raise funds for a polio vaccine says his wife can’t even recognise him - after he trimmed it for the first time in 52 YEARS. Dr Manoj Joshi, 68, says he had never shaved his moustache ever since he could grow one as a fresh faced 16-year-old but decided to chop it all off in a bid to “eradicate polio”. But after he chopped it off his shocked wife said she couldn’t recognise him as she’d never seen him without it in the 42 years they had been married. The grandfather-of-two joked that it would take a lawn mower to trim his luscious facial hair - which is older than the invention of the mobile phone. Dr Joshi, a proud Rotarian, which is a worldwide charitable society with over a million members worldwide, has been involved in what he calls “acts of giving” for his entire life. On World Polio Day (Saturday, Oct 24) he took centre stage at a park in front of Bradford City Hall to shave off his beloved moustache in an “emotional day”.
Dr Manoj Joshi, 68, has not shaved since he was 16 years old but decided to chop it all off for the cause on World Polio Day. (SWNS)
Dr Manoj Joshi, 68, shaved his moustache for the first time in 52 YEARS at Bradford City Hall to raise funds to eradicate polio. See SWNS story SWLEmoustache; A man who shaved his moustache to raise funds for a polio vaccine says his wife can’t even recognise him - after he trimmed it for the first time in 52 YEARS. Dr Manoj Joshi, 68, says he had never shaved his moustache ever since he could grow one as a fresh faced 16-year-old but decided to chop it all off in a bid to “eradicate polio”. But after he chopped it off his shocked wife said she couldn’t recognise him as she’d never seen him without it in the 42 years they had been married. The grandfather-of-two joked that it would take a lawn mower to trim his luscious facial hair - which is older than the invention of the mobile phone. Dr Joshi, a proud Rotarian, which is a worldwide charitable society with over a million members worldwide, has been involved in what he calls “acts of giving” for his entire life. On World Polio Day (Saturday, Oct 24) he took centre stage at a park in front of Bradford City Hall to shave off his beloved moustache in an “emotional day”.
Dr Manoj Joshi took centre-stage at a park in front of Bradford City Hall to have his beard and moustache shaved off. (SWNS)

On Saturday, World Polio Day, he took centre-stage at a park in front of Bradford City Hall to shave off his beloved moustache.

He was nervous and said he’d miss his beard, which was painted purple as an homage to how immunised children had their little finger dyed purple.

When a child receives their polio drops on mass polio immunisation days, their little finger is painted with a purple dye so it is clear they have received the vaccine.

Watch: Wild Polio wiped out in Africa

Read more: Top scientist who battled COVID-19 says we will never live normally without vaccine

Dr Joshi, from Bradford, West Yorkshire, hopes to raise awareness and funds for the Rotary Foundation’s End Polio Now campaign – and has so far raised nearly £4,000.

He said: “It was such an emotional day for me because this cause means the world and if we can eradicate polio and make sure no child is at risk – it will be a great day.

“We are so close and I think we need to keep doing all we can to push over the final stretch.

“For me, it’s very strange to be without my moustache which I’ve had for 52 long years – but shaving it off is nothing compared to what we are fighting for.

Collect photo of Dr Manoj Joshi as a young man. See SWNS story SWLEmoustache; A man who shaved his moustache to raise funds for a polio vaccine says his wife can’t even recognise him - after he trimmed it for the first time in 52 YEARS. Dr Manoj Joshi, 68, says he had never shaved his moustache ever since he could grow one as a fresh faced 16-year-old but decided to chop it all off in a bid to “eradicate polio”. But after he chopped it off his shocked wife said she couldn’t recognise him as she’d never seen him without it in the 42 years they had been married. The grandfather-of-two joked that it would take a lawn mower to trim his luscious facial hair - which is older than the invention of the mobile phone. Dr Joshi, a proud Rotarian, which is a worldwide charitable society with over a million members worldwide, has been involved in what he calls “acts of giving” for his entire life. On World Polio Day (Saturday, Oct 24) he took centre stage at a park in front of Bradford City Hall to shave off his beloved moustache in an “emotional day”.
Dr Manoj Joshi as a young man. (SWNS)
Dr Manoj Joshi, 68, shaved his moustache for the first time in 52 YEARS at Bradford City Hall to raise funds to eradicate polio. See SWNS story SWLEmoustache; A man who shaved his moustache to raise funds for a polio vaccine says his wife can’t even recognise him - after he trimmed it for the first time in 52 YEARS. Dr Manoj Joshi, 68, says he had never shaved his moustache ever since he could grow one as a fresh faced 16-year-old but decided to chop it all off in a bid to “eradicate polio”. But after he chopped it off his shocked wife said she couldn’t recognise him as she’d never seen him without it in the 42 years they had been married. The grandfather-of-two joked that it would take a lawn mower to trim his luscious facial hair - which is older than the invention of the mobile phone. Dr Joshi, a proud Rotarian, which is a worldwide charitable society with over a million members worldwide, has been involved in what he calls “acts of giving” for his entire life. On World Polio Day (Saturday, Oct 24) he took centre stage at a park in front of Bradford City Hall to shave off his beloved moustache in an “emotional day”.
The 68-year-old says that his wife struggled to recognise him after going under the chop. (SWNS)

“The barber told me he would need a lawnmower to shave it all off – but thankfully he managed in just 30 minutes.

“It was light-hearted fun but there is a profound importance to this. These causes are so close to my heart.

“But I do feel very weird and strange now without my beard and moustache.

“You don’t normally keep something for half a century but my moustache has always been there.”

While there hasn’t been a case of

Read More
health

El Paso imposes curfew as COVID-19 cases overwhelm hospitals: “We are in a crisis stage”

Residents in the Texas border city of El Paso have been urged to stay home for two weeks as a spike in coronavirus cases overwhelms hospitals. The crisis prompted the state to dedicate part of the city’s civic center as a makeshift care center for the ill.

Virus Outbreak Texas
A woman holds up a mask she bought at a store on Friday, May 1, 2020, in El Paso, Texas. 

Cedar Attanasio / AP


El Paso County Judge Ricardo Samaniego on Sunday night issued a stay home order with a daily curfew from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. Violators could be fined $500 under the order.

“We are in a crisis stage,” said Samaniego, the county’s top elected official.

Earlier Sunday, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott said 50 hospital beds will be set up in the convention center and another 50 beds could be added if needed.

Abbott ordered the alternate care site to expand hospital capacity in the El Paso area in response to the coronavirus surge, he said. The site, scheduled to open this week, will provide additional medical equipment and medical personnel.

The surge in El Paso cases comes as President Donald Trump downplayed the virus’ effect on Texas, saying during last week’s presidential debate: “There was a very big spike in Texas, it’s now gone.”

The state has already provided over 900 medical personnel to El Paso, some of whom will be staffing the convention center site.

“The alternate care site and auxiliary medical units will reduce the strain on hospitals in El Paso as we contain the spread of COVID-19 in the region,” Abbott said.

El Paso County health officials reported 772 new coronavirus cases Sunday, a day after a record 1,216 new cases were reported, making up more than 20% of the 3,793 new cases reported statewide. That brought the total cases since the pandemic first hit Texas to 862,375. An estimated 91,885 active cases was the most since Aug. 30, and the 5,206 COVID-19 hospitalizations reported statewide Sunday was the most since Aug. 22.

Source Article

Read More
health

U.S. News Names Best Nursing Homes for 2020-21

Nursing Home profiles to also include new patient safety information, highlighting up-to-date COVID-19 data.

WASHINGTON, Oct. 27, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — U.S. News & World Report, the global authority in health care rankings, today released the 2020-21 Best Nursing Homes. As nursing homes and facilities across the nation cope with the impacts of the coronavirus pandemic, U.S. News remains committed to providing data-driven information and guidance to help patients, families and caregivers understand their long-term and short-term care options. This year, to accompany the new ratings, nursing home profile pages were updated to include a patient safety summary that reflects COVID-19 data alongside other measurements of safety and related advice on choosing a home or facility amidst the pandemic.

U.S. News & World Report Logo. (PRNewsfoto/U.S. News & World Report)
U.S. News & World Report Logo. (PRNewsfoto/U.S. News & World Report)

“U.S. News strives to provide access to information that allows consumers to make educated decisions on all types of care,” said Ben Harder, managing editor and chief of health analysis at U.S. News. “Updating the profiles to include a patient safety summary that highlights COVID-19 data paired with other measures of care arms families, caregivers and patients with the information needed to make a decision that keeps safety at the highest priority.”  

The 11th year of the U.S. News Best Nursing Homes combines comprehensive information about care, health inspections and staffing with COVID-19 outbreaks, flu and pneumonia vaccination rates, and infection control violations listed on the patient safety summary. Individuals can easily conduct customized research for a highly rated nursing home by location, size, Medicare and Medicaid coverage and Alzheimer’s care.

In addition to helping families find the best nursing home for their loved one, U.S. News published pieces on nursing home patient safety during COVID-19 and what to expect as nursing homes resume in-person visits. These pieces join new Hospital Hero profiles featuring a nursing home activities director easing pandemic-related isolation and a public policy expert calling for nursing home employees’ wages and benefits to reflect the current dangerous nature of their jobs.

This year, California has the highest number on the list, with 215 nursing homes that received a High Performing Rating in Short-Term Rehabilitation and 135 designated as High Performing in Long-Term Care, followed by Florida, Illinois and New Jersey. Hawaii, Maine and Alaska have the highest proportion of Best Nursing Homes with at least half of all Medicare or Medicaid certified nursing homes in these states receiving a High-Performing designation in either Short-Term Rehabilitation or Long-Term Care, or both. The Best Nursing Homes reflect U.S. News’ analysis of data collected and published by the federal government using a methodology defined by U.S. News that evaluates factors that U.S. News has determined most impact patient and resident care, safety and outcomes.

The Best Nursing Home finder features ratings on both long-term and short-term care. The Long-Term Care Rating aims to provide prospective residents who need help with daily activities, and their families, with analysis and information regarding the quality

Read More
health

A Malaria Mystery, Partly Solved: What Happens When the Rains End?

But during the dry season, the researchers found, the parasites in most red blood cells stopped making the sticky versions of that protein. They slipped away into the spleen to their destruction. But a few clingy survivors hung on, and appeared to slow down their metabolism, like microscopic bears hibernating for the winter.

This had two effects that protected them.

First, by measuring the inflammatory proteins produced by the immune system, Dr. Portugal showed that the reclusive parasites had somehow become too “quiet” to trigger the immune counterattack that might destroy them.

Second, too few sticky cells remained to clog brain capillaries, so even infected children survived.

“A parasite that kills its host during the dry season reaches a dead end,” Dr. Portugal said.

Sarah K. Volkman, a molecular biologist at Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health and a leading malaria expert, called the new study “important.” Dr. Volkman’s research in Senegal has found that parasite lineages persisted in villages for 10 years. She noted that understanding the importance of that small dry-season reservoir could reveal ways to destroy the parasites when they are at their weakest.

Dr. Miriam K. Laufer, a malaria specialist at the University of Maryland’s medical school, also praised the study, saying it “delivered concrete data about things we thought were the case, such as that the dry season infections do not elicit a big immune response.”

Dr. Nicholas J. White, director of a malaria research unit based at the University of Oxford and Mahidol University in Thailand, was more reserved, noting that researchers in Vietnam had previously shown that parasites persist in dry months.

Parasites might simply “change their clothes” every few cycles to avoid being recognized by the immune system, he argued, and the lower number of cells clinging to walls could be explained by a change in the host’s antibody response rather than by a change in the parasite.

Source Article

Read More
health

No Indoor Dining In Northbrook Under New Coronavirus Restrictions

NORTHBROOK, IL — Indoor dining at Northbrook restaurants will be forbidden starting Wednesday, as state public health officials announced new restrictions aimed at slowing the spread of the coronavirus. All service inside bars and restaurants in suburban Cook County will be off-limits, all outdoor eating or drinking has to stop by 11 p.m. and gatherings will be limited to a maximum of 25 people.

It marks the first time the additional mitigation measures will be applied to Arlington Heights and the rest of the Cook County suburbs, although similar restrictions are already in place in Regions 7 and 8, including DuPage, Kane, Kankakee and Will counties.

According to data from the Cook County Department of Public Health, the average number of new confirmed cases rose by 75.9 percent from Oct. 7 through Wednesday, the most recent day where data is available, compared to the prior two weeks.

As of Monday, there have been 742 confirmed coronavirus-related cases in Arlington Heights, according to the Cook County Department of Public Health with 56 new cases last week. That marks an 119 percent increase in confirmed cases over the last 14 days.

(Cook County Department of Public Health)
(Cook County Department of Public Health)

In suburban Cook County overall, the positivity rate and the rate of hospital admissions has been rising sharply. As of Thursday, the most recent day when data is available from the Illinois Department of Public Health, the rounded rolling average of daily new hospital admissions of people with symptoms of COVID-19 had risen to 49 — more than doubling since the start of October.

“We are seeing test positivity across the state increase, but for Region 10, Suburban Cook County, we are also seeing a steady increase in hospitalizations for COVID-like illness,” IDPH Director Dr. Ngozi Ezike said in a statement announcing the new restrictions. “At the beginning of the pandemic, we were concerned about overwhelming our hospitals, and we must take action now to prevent that possibility.”

RELATED: 1 Coronavirus Death, 61 New Cases Since Last Week In Northbrook

With Monday’s announcement of new measures in suburban Cook County, Region 10, and the re-imposition of restrictions on the Metro East region, Region 4, more than half of the state’s 11 COVID-19 resurgence mitigation regions will be under some form of additional resurgence mitigation.

Starting at 12:01 a.m. on Oct. 28, the following rules take effect in Northbrook and other Cook County suburbs:

Bars/Restaurants

  • No indoor service

  • All outside service closes at 11:00 p.m.

  • All patrons should be seated at tables outside

  • No ordering, seating, or congregating at bars — bar stools should be removed

  • Tables should be 6 feet apart

  • No standing or congregating indoors or outdoors while waiting for a table or exiting

  • No dancing or standing indoors

  • Reservations required for each party

  • No seating of multiple parties at one table

Meetings, Social Events, Gatherings

  • Limit to lesser of 25 guests or 25 percent of overall room capacity

  • No party buses

  • Gaming and Casinos close at 11:00 p.m., are limited to

Read More
health

Fauci Calls Situation ‘Quite Precarious,’ Tamps Down Vaccine Expectations

KEY POINTS

  • Fauci said the nation is “at the highest baseline” after officials reported more than 80,000 new cases in a single day two days in a row
  • The top health official expressed optimism over the ongoing coronavirus vaccine trials
  • A potential vaccine would likely only prevent symptomatic cases of coronavirus

The coronavirus situation in the U.S.  is “quite precarious” amid a resurgence of new cases across multiple states, said Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, on Monday.

The U.S. is “at the highest baseline” it has ever been during the pandemic after health officials recorded more than 80,000 new coronavirus cases on both Friday and Saturday, Fauci said. The previous single-day record of 74,818 cases was set in July. 

“We came back up again to the worst that we’ve ever had, which was over 80,000 per day,” Fauci, who is director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious, said. “It’s been up and wavering up and down till now, we’re at the highest baseline we’ve ever been, which is really quite precarious.”

Fauci expressed optimism over the results from various ongoing coronavirus vaccine trials. He said results should be available at the end of November or the beginning of December. However, he noted that a vaccine would not eradicate the virus. Instead, it would only decrease a person’s chances of having symptoms.  

“The primary thing you want to do is that if people get infected, prevent them from getting sick, and if you prevent them from getting sick, you will ultimately prevent them from getting seriously ill,” Fauci said. 

The infectious disease expert also emphasized the importance of observing preventive measures, including wearing face masks, avoiding large gatherings, social distancing, and frequent handwashing, Business Insider reported. 

“We can do this. I’m absolutely convinced that as a nation, if we pull together and do some fundamental common-denominator public-health measures, that we can get through this with a lot of help in the future from vaccines and adequate therapies,” he said. 

American health officials have reported nearly 8.7 million coronavirus cases since the pandemic began. The number of cases recorded globally is also inching closer to 43.5 million. More than 225,000 people in the country have died due to COVID-19. 

The U.S. continues to have the highest number of reported coronavirus cases worldwide. It is followed by India, which has recorded 7.9 million cases, Brazil with 5.4 million cases, and Russia with 1.5 million COVID-19 cases, Johns Hopkins University reported.    Fauci said the government would not make any future COVID-19 vaccine obligatory for the general public Fauci said the government would not make any future COVID-19 vaccine obligatory for the general public Photo: POOL / Al Drago

Source Article

Read More
health

New Hampshire COVID-19 Positivity Test Rate At 1.6%: Data

CONCORD, NH — Two more elderly men have died due to or from COVID-19, according to New Hampshire health officials.

The men both lived in long-term care settings in Hillsborough County and were 80 years of age or older. The State Joint Information Center offered sympathies to family members and friends of the men. The state said 475 deaths are related to COVID-19 exposure.

Another 77 people in the Granite State tested positive for the coronavirus including eight children after more than 5,200 specimens were collected Sunday. Slightly more than half the cases were male. About 800 tests are pending for a polymerase chain reaction test positivity rate of 1.6 percent Monday. About two-thirds of the new positive test results were discovered by PCR rests.

The new positive test results bring the accumulative county to 10.397 with 8,920 or about 86 percent recovered.

Most of the new cases were from Rockingham County — 18, while 15 live in Merrimack County, 10 reside in Hillsborough County outside of Manchester and Nashua, and seven live in Nashua.

Twenty-five people are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 and 1,002 people are current cases.

The state said Monday that 333,115 people have been tested via PCR tests and 32,015 have been tested by antibody lab tests. More than 585,000 PCR tests have been administered in New Hampshire.

About 4,450 residents are under public health monitoring.

Editor’s note: Due to technical problems with the state’s COVID-19 charts, more data and information was not available at post time.

ALSO READ:

Stop The Spread Of COVID-19

The COVID-19 virus is spread through respiratory droplets, usually through coughing and sneezing, and exposure to others who are sick or might be showing symptoms.

Health officials emphasize residents should follow these recommendations:

  • Avoid any domestic and international travel, especially on public transportation such as buses, trains, and airplanes.

  • Practice social distancing. Stay at least 6 feet from other people, including distancing while in waiting areas or lines.

  • When you can’t practice 6 feet of social distancing, wear a face covering.

  • Anyone who is told to self-quarantine and stay at home due to exposure to a person with confirmed or suspected case of COVID-19 needs to stay home and not go out into public places.

  • If you are 60 years or older or have chronic and underlying health conditions, you need to stay home and not go out.

  • Avoid gatherings of 10 people or more.

  • Employers should work from home as much as possible.

  • There is increasing evidence that the virus can survive for hours or possibly days on surfaces. People should clean frequently touched surfaces, including door handles, grocery carts and grocery basket handles, etc.

Take the same precautions as you would if you were sick:

  • Stay home and avoid public places.

  • Wear a face covering.

  • Cover mouth and nose when coughing and sneezing.

  • Wash hands frequently.

  • Disinfect frequently touched surfaces.

More information from the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services about coronavirus can be found here on

Read More
health

Cancer Diagnostics Market Research Report by Diagnostic Type, by Indication – Global Forecast to 2025

Cancer Diagnostics Market Research Report by Diagnostic Type (Biopsy and Cytology Test, Diagnostic Imaging Test, and Tumor Biomarkers), by Indication (Blood Cancer, Breast Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, and Kidney Cancer) – Global Forecast to 2025 – Cumulative Impact of COVID-19

New York, Oct. 26, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Reportlinker.com announces the release of the report “Cancer Diagnostics Market Research Report by Diagnostic Type, by Indication – Global Forecast to 2025 – Cumulative Impact of COVID-19” – https://www.reportlinker.com/p05913709/?utm_source=GNW

The Global Cancer Diagnostics Market is expected to grow from USD 140,325.96 Million in 2019 to USD 221,237.88 Million by the end of 2025 at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 7.88%.

Market Segmentation & Coverage:
This research report categorizes the Cancer Diagnostics to forecast the revenues and analyze the trends in each of the following sub-markets:

Based on Diagnostic Type, the Cancer Diagnostics Market studied across Biopsy and Cytology Test, Diagnostic Imaging Test, and Tumor Biomarkers.

Based on Indication, the Cancer Diagnostics Market studied across Blood Cancer, Breast Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Kidney Cancer, Liver Cancer, Lung Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Pancreatic Cancer, Prostate Cancer, and Skin Cancer.

Based on Geography, the Cancer Diagnostics Market studied across Americas, Asia-Pacific, and Europe, Middle East & Africa. The Americas region surveyed across Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Mexico, and United States. The Asia-Pacific region surveyed across Australia, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Philippines, South Korea, and Thailand. The Europe, Middle East & Africa region surveyed across France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Qatar, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Spain, United Arab Emirates, and United Kingdom.

Company Usability Profiles:
The report deeply explores the recent significant developments by the leading vendors and innovation profiles in the Global Cancer Diagnostics Market including Abbott Laboratories, Agilent Technologies Inc., Becton Dickinson & Company, F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, GE Healthcare, Hologic Inc., Illumina Inc., Philips Healthcare, Qiagen NV, Siemens Healthcare GmbH, and Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc..

FPNV Positioning Matrix:
The FPNV Positioning Matrix evaluates and categorizes the vendors in the Cancer Diagnostics Market on the basis of Business Strategy (Business Growth, Industry Coverage, Financial Viability, and Channel Support) and Product Satisfaction (Value for Money, Ease of Use, Product Features, and Customer Support) that aids businesses in better decision making and understanding the competitive landscape.

Competitive Strategic Window:
The Competitive Strategic Window analyses the competitive landscape in terms of markets, applications, and geographies. The Competitive Strategic Window helps the vendor define an alignment or fit between their capabilities and opportunities for future growth prospects. During a forecast period, it defines the optimal or favorable fit for the vendors to adopt successive merger and acquisition strategies, geography expansion, research & development, and new product introduction strategies to execute further business expansion and growth.

Cumulative Impact of COVID-19:
COVID-19 is an incomparable global public health emergency that has affected almost every industry, so for and, the long-term effects projected to impact the industry growth during the forecast period. Our ongoing research amplifies our research framework to ensure the inclusion of underlaying COVID-19 issues and

Read More
health

Cold temperatures, vitamin A can help the body burn more fat, study shows

People looking to lose weight may start embracing the winter months after a new study found cold temperatures and increased vitamin A encourage fat burning.

The study, which was published in the journal Molecular Metabolism last week, explored the effects cold temperatures and vitamin A had on converting white fat, which is where excess calories are stored, to brown fat, which “stimulates fat burning and heat generation.”

More than 90% of the human body’s fat deposits are white fat, which is stored in the abdomen, bottom and upper thighs, the study shares.

Cold temperatures applied to mice was found to increase vitamin A production, which resulted in higher fat burning. 

Cold temperatures applied to mice was found to increase vitamin A production, which resulted in higher fat burning. 
(iStock)

LONDON MARATHON MEDALIST SARA HALL SAYS POSITIVITY AND FAITH HELPED HER ACROSS THE FINISH LINE

According to the findings, cold temperatures increased vitamin A levels, which helps convert white to brown fat, thus stimulating fat burning. Vitamin A reserves are mostly stored in the liver. Once cold was applied to the mice in the study, the increases in “the levels of vitamin A and its blood transporter, retinol-binding protein” led to a higher rate of fat burning as the white fat converted to brown as the body attempting to keep itself warm.

Alternatively, when “the vitamin A transporter ‘retinol-binding protein’” was blocked in mice, the fat did not “brown” and the mice were unable to protect themselves from the cold.

FITNESS INFLUENCER SHOWS HOW ‘BEFORE AND AFTER’ PHOTOS ARE MANIPULATED

The study is promising in finding solutions to dealing with weight gain and obesity. Though the study’s lead researcher, Florian Kiefer from the Medical University of Vienna, cautioned against taking large quantities of vitamin A supplements in an effort to lose weight.

WOMAN LOSES 117 POUNDS AFTER BEING TURNED AWAY FROM BRIDAL BOUTIQUE

“Our results show that vitamin A plays an important role in the function of adipose tissue and affects global energy metabolism. However, this is not an argument for consuming large amounts of vitamin A supplements if not prescribed, because it is critical that vitamin A is transported to the right cells at the right time,” explains the MedUni Vienna researcher. “We have discovered a new mechanism by which vitamin A regulates lipid combustion and heat generation in cold conditions. This could help us to develop new therapeutic interventions that exploit this specific mechanism.”

Source Article

Read More