Day: May 22, 2020

Cosmetic Medicines Ordering, Storage, Supply and Incident Reporting

This article gives an overview of the systems and processes that must be followed by cosmetic clinics when supplying prescription medicines.

A prescription medicine or drug legally requires a qualified doctor, dentist, nurse or pharmacist to write a prescription for a named patient. The list of drugs and prescribing qualifications may vary in different countries.

A cosmetic clinic must ensure that all medicines are ordered, stored and supplied within the legislative and other relevant pharmaceutical guidelines available.

Therefore ordering, storage and supply of medicines for use within the practice must be undertaken according to appropriate procedures and guidelines to ensure all relevant legislation and pharmaceutical information is adhered to.

Any medicines stored within a typical cosmetic clinic are those used for aesthetic purposes, this includes drugs such as Botox ® and Hyaluronidase. These must be stored according to manufacturer’s guidelines in a locked refrigerator or locked cabinet as appropriate. The temperature of the refrigerator should be monitored and documented daily. If the temperature is found to be outside the recommended range the pharmacy supplier must be informed as soon as possible and if necessary the medicines are returned to the supplier and a new supply obtained.

Supply of Medicines and Maintaining Patient Records for Cosmetic Clinics

The Medical Practitioner is responsible for maintaining a record of medicines obtained from the supplier for use during treatment. A copy of the prescription is retained in the patient’s notes and the following information is noted in the Medicines IN register. The Medical practitioner must include the following details:

– the name of the medicine (generic)

– the dose provided by the pharmacy

– the amount provided by the pharmacy

– the format of the medicine (oral I IM etc)

– the batch numbers and expiry dates

The Medical Practitioner is responsible for ensuring that details of the medicines administered are recorded in the patient notes, including:

– the name of the medicine (generic)

– the dose provided

– the route of administration

– the batch number and expiry date of the medicine

– the date and time of administration

The Medical Practitioner must also document in the Medicines OUT register the name of the patient the medicine was administered to and the date and time of administration. This will ensure an audit trail is available for each practitioner.

All medicines not used or expired must be returned to the pharmacy.

In conclusion only a medical professional should be accepted on a cosmetic training course. This will ensure all practitioners have experience with the use of prescription only medicines and record keeping. The medical practitioner who facilitates a cosmetic intervention should be a qualified doctor, dentist, nurse or pharmacist. These specialists have the prerequisite medical experience plus understand their legal and ethical requirements in prescribing, dispensing and administration of such drugs.

Any errors with the medication must be recorded and reported.

Reporting a Medication Incident

A cosmetic clinic must ensure that all medication incidents follow local legislative and other guidelines for your country …

Is Black Pepper Good For You?

Black pepper has been used for thousands of years and although this may not appear pertinent to the question "Is black pepper good for you?" we should possibly remember that some clinical trials of natural substances are speeded up because they have been consumed for centuries without any (or hardly any) reported deaths.

Black, white and green peppercorns all cone from the same plant Piper nigrum with black pepper being the dried whole unripe fruit of the plant and white pepper being the ripe fruit with the outer skin removed. People tend to prefer the taste of black pepper to white and there are far fewer culinary opponents due to the overuse of black as opposed to white pepper.

The oil from black pepper has been given to patients who have suffered strokes to inhale so that they can swallow better. Alzheimer's sufferers have also been given it to inhale with beneficial results reported, although more trials are needed to ascertain how this works precisely. Other studies have shown that the oil when inhaled has improved withdrawal symptoms in people who are trying to stop smoking cigarettes.

Black pepper has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, and so helps to prevent the risks of cancers. It also may have anti-microbial properties, and it contains vanadium which is being researched for its potential benefits in improving insulin sensitivity and blood sugar levels in people with Type -2 diabetes.

Both black and white pepper can be applied directly onto the skin as a counter-irritant to scabies and for the relief of neuralgia. In the Asian subcontinent the black variety is used in food for those with weak stomachs who have digestive disorders, as it is thought to increase the flow of digestive juices. However it can cause dyspepsia (upset stomach) in some people. It has also been used in the treatment of bronchitis and cancer. Modern medical studies have found that black pepper may protect against colon cancer, but there is the possibility that it may on the other hand promote cancer of the liver. It is also believed that there may be a link between ingestion of black pepper and esophageal cancer.

Inhalation of the pepper (not the oil) can result in respiratory irritation, oedema (swelling), respiratory arrest, severe anoxia and even death-so do not inhale it.

Black pepper has been approved in foodstuffs by the US Food and Drink Administration in the Generally Regarded as Safe (GRAS) category. Using it as a medicine is not to be recommended. However, using it in food should not cause a problem. Inhaling it would seem to be a rather strange thing to do and given the results, best avoided.

If you use this pepper in the usual way then you should not have any worries. In the traditional forms of medicine in the Indian subcontinent it is not used when frying food, only in sauces and stews, or sprinkled over salads. Red chillies are used for medicinal purposes rather than other types of pepper, and …