general

Saving My Head from Baldness

One thing that I hoped would never happen to me suddenly did. I noticed after getting out of the shower one day that the top of my head was looking a little thin. I was afraid that my hair was starting to fall out and looked at different ways to counter act it, outside of getting hair plugs or some kind of hair transplant. I found out that Propecia Finasteride is a great product for preventing hair loss, so I got my hands on some as soon as I could.

Most people my age shift into the bald phase when they start to lose their hair. They figure that they won’t look good at all with thinning or lost hair, so they just shave it all off and go completely bald. While the bald look works for some, I don’t think it’s for me.…

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general

Feeling Like a Younger Man

Ever since turning 40, things have been different for me in the bedroom. My wife and I used to have the most amazing times in bed, but things weren’t as fun as before. I didn’t have the same amount of energy that I did when when first got married. It was like I was a sluggish old man who was trying to satisfy a young woman. I didn’t know what to do, and my wife suggested that I try something like Cialis from the Ciali365 store. I thought about it for a long time and decided that my wife was right, so I ordered some of the product.

I was a little nervous about trying Cialis, because I didn’t know how it would affect me.…

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general

My Computer is a Real Mess

Of course I let Shell use my laptop a lot, she is over to my place a lot and I like that a lot. I did not like that she ended up getting some really horrendous malware the other day. Apparently she was on the web looking for some cheap careprost, which is a real mystery to me to be honest. I had not a single clue what she meant, but that is apparently some substance which you put on your eyelashes to make them seem thicker or fuller or whatever. I looked at her eyelashes and tried to figure out if they looked different than usual. She got mad at me for not knowing, but I honestly had not ever really focused on that.…

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general

I Never Thought I’d Have Full Eyelashes

I have never had thick and full eyelashes. It was something I always wanted, but I found that it was something that I would probably not get. At least, that used to be my attitude. I am not the only one in my family with this problem, so I was really surprised to see my cousin with nice thick lashes not long ago. They did not look fake at all, but I knew they had to be. That is why I was surprised when she told me that she had been using Careprost, an eye drop product that was recommended to her by a friend she knows.

I was mostly impressed because they looked so natural on her, which is why I was surprised to find out that they were. They were not attached in any way at all. All she does is use eye drops, and those thick luscious lashes are the result.…

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health

Dubai launches new dedicated centre for treating infectious diseases



a group of people in a room: Hospitality Care Centre Dubai Healthcare Authority


© Motivate Publishing
Hospitality Care Centre Dubai Healthcare Authority

The Dubai Health Authority (DHA) has inaugurated a Hospitality Care Centre dedicated to the treatment of infectious diseases, including Covid-19.

The specialised facility is located in the Dubai Industrial Zone and has 170 rooms spread across of three floors.

The state-of-the art centre includes clinics, pharmacy, laboratory, radiology and follow-up services.

It is operational 24×7 and has already begun receiving Covid-19 cases. There are 88 rooms dedicated for treatment of Covid-19 patients.

Patients will be treated under the supervision of staff from Rashid Hospital, since the centre is directly affiliated with the hospital.

Humaid Al Qutami, director-general of the DHA said that the authority had worked towards increasing the capacity of its medical facilities, in anticipation of any developments.

He added that the objective is for the facility in the future to become an international centre specialised in treating communicable diseases, providing highly advanced laboratory for radiology and diagnostic tests, and serving as unit for epidemiological research and studies.

Earlier this month, the authority launched three new dedicated Covid-19 testing facilities in the emirate at Al Rashidiya Majlis, Al Hamriya Port Majlis and Jumeirah 1 Port Majlis, in collaboration with the Community Development Authority Dubai.

Read: DHA opens three new Covid-19 testing facilities in Dubai

It takes the number of DHA centres exclusively for Covid-19 testing up to five – which includes those already opened at Al Shabab Al-Ahli and Al Nasr Clubs.

On Tuesday, the UAE reported 1,390 new cases, 1,708 recoveries and two deaths in the last 24 hours. The registered infection count has therefore risen to 127,624.

Read: Covid-19 update: UAE reports 1,390 cases; 466 infections registered in Oman

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dentist

Dentist kidnapped from Hyderabad rescued in Andhra Pradesh, within 24 hours- The New Indian Express

By Express News Service

HYDERABAD: Within 24 hours of getting kidnapped from his dental clinic in Hyderabad on Tuesday, Dr Hussain was rescued on Wednesday early morning by Andhra Pradesh police in Ananthapuram district. 

Based on a tip-off by Telangana police, their counterparts managed to intercept the vehicle in which the kidnappers were travelling to Bengaluru. A couple of men present in the vehicle were caught while a few others managed to escape. 

The AP police will hand over the victim, suffered mild injuries due to assault, to the Telangana force.

Interestingly, the kidnappers had demanded Dr Hussain’s family a ransom of Rs 10 crore in the form of Bitcoins. 

According to police, the kidnappers got into Dr Hussain’s dental clinic in Kismatpur under Rajendranagar police limits posing as patients. Minutes after entering his room, they kidnapped the dentist around 1 pm, forced him into his own four-wheeler and drove away. 

Later, four more accused joined the gang and the vehicle proceeded towards the Bengaluru Highway. In the meantime, Rajendranagar police received information about the incident, tracked the vehicle and alerted the AP police. 

Personnel posted in checkpoints in Ananthapuram were quickly alerted who checked every vehicle and later rescued Dr Hussain. In a video recorded after his rescue, the dentist said that around five burqa-clad persons kidnapped him from his clinic at around 1 pm on Tuesday.

“They knew that I live in Prestige Royal Woods In Kismatpur. They took my vehicle’s key that was kept on the table. I tried to resist and screamed twice as well but there was no one around. They forced me in to my own vehicle and took me away.

“Later, they changed the vehicle. They took me in an auto and kept me in a room for a while where they provided me water and spoke properly. Then they again put me in a four-wheeler and took me away. I could not see my watch but it must have been around 2 am then,” Dr Hussain said.

The dentist’s face was completely covered and his hands were tied when he was rescued. Dr Hussain also runs a real estate business and well off. 
 

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medicine

Americans have a choice: Socialized medicine or health care freedom

As an emergency room physician and cancer survivor, I understand that each minute counts in a medical emergency. And as our nation chooses a direction on health care this November, we need to remember the realities that follow from government-run socialized medicine — increased taxes, longer wait times, delayed care and fewer incentives to maintain a healthy lifestyle.

Socialized medicine will have profoundly negative effects on our country. The Medicare for All plans proposed by Democrats in the House and Senate are authoritarian measures that will control the lives of Americans in the most intimate way possible. Under Medicare for All, the federal government will possess the medical records of every American and have the power to dictate when and what type of care you receive. This will ultimately lead to rationed care and unaccountable bureaucrats making the most difficult, ethical decisions about your life.

The Tennesseans I represent have no interest in allowing the federal government to take such an intrusive role in our health care decisions. If the government pays for our health care, are they going to tell us how many kids we can have, whether we can drink sugary sodas, or whether we can smoke? Ultimately, socialized medicine endangers our freedom to make life choices. That’s why the best direction for America’s health care system is to get the heavy hand of government out of the way and let patients, doctors, and states make their own medical decisions.

Socialized medicine will not only entail a massive government expansion into the private life of every American: It will also place a tremendous burden on the backs of the American taxpayers. Neither Medicare for All bill even attempts to put a price on its plan. That is always a bad sign. Organizations across the political spectrum have estimated the costs, and the numbers are staggering. According to the Mercatus Center, Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersObama book excerpt: ‘Hard to deny my overconfidence’ during early health care discussions Americans have a choice: Socialized medicine or health care freedom Ocasio-Cortez says Democrats must focus on winning White House for Biden MORE’ (I-Vt.) Medicare for All plan could cost taxpayers an additional $32.6 trillion over ten years.

Sanders’ plan does not specify where the money will come from, but we know the only way to pay for it will be to dramatically raise taxes across the board. The Heritage Foundation estimates that two-thirds of American households will see a dramatic increase in taxes. In other words, American families will be paying more for supposedly “free health care.”

Public option health care plans like those favored by Presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenDemocrats warn GOP will regret Barrett confirmation Trump campaign eyes election night party at his sold-out DC hotel Harris blasts GOP for confirming Amy Coney Barrett: ‘We won’t forget this’ MORE are just as radical, despite rhetoric that suggests otherwise. Dr. Lanhee J. Chen of the Hoover Institute explains that a “public option could add more than $700 billion

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health

U.K study finds sharp drop in COVID-19 antibodies just months after infection

One of the vexing things about coronaviruses like the common cold is that the immune response they induce is often short-lived. You catch a cold, recover and then catch it again six months later.

New research published Tuesday indicates fading immunity might also occur with the much more serious coronavirus, SARS CoV-2. Imperial College London scientists found that in a random sample of 365,000 adults in the United Kingdom, the presence of COVID-19 antibodies declined in all age groups by 26% from June to September.

The subjects in the REACT2 study, which has not been peer-reviewed, were given finger-prick tests in three rounds over the summer. After the first round, which ended in July, about 60 of 1,000 people in the sample, or 6%, had positive antibodies. By the end of September, that number had fallen to 44 per 1,000 (4.4%).

Age appeared to affect antibody duration. Younger people had higher levels than those over 65, and their antibodies lasted longer.


A faster decline in antibodies was observed in asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic cases than in those with full-blown symptoms, said Professor Wendy Barclay, head of the college’s infectious disease department, in a video call with journalists. Health care workers showed no change in antibody levels, possibly due to continuous on-the-job exposure to the virus.

“On the balance of evidence, I would say, with what we know for other coronaviruses, it would look as if immunity declines away at the same rate as antibodies decline away, and that this is an indication of waning immunity at the population level,” Barclay added.

“We don’t yet know what level of antibody is needed in a person’s blood to prevent reinfection,” she added.

Just a handful of cases of people getting COVID-19 twice have been confirmed. But immunity from the first wave of infections in March and April may only now be starting to dissipate, raising the prospect of more repeat cases, according to epidemiologists.

The findings suggest that those expecting increased infections to result in so-called herd immunity over time could be disappointed.

Herd immunity occurs when enough of a population is immune to a disease, making it unlikely to spread and protecting the rest of the community.

If no vaccine is developed, the portion of the population that would have to recover from COVID-19 in order to achieve herd immunity is estimated at about 70%, or more than 200 million people in the United States, according to the Mayo Clinic.

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fitness

Auckland cemetery visitor slams exercise group running a loud fitness boot camp next to graveyard

Rest in beats: Mourning son paying his respects to his late father at a cemetery is interrupted by a fitness boot camp playing loud music

  • A man visited an Auckland cemetery to mourn his dead father on his birthday 
  • His sacred silence was broken by a loud exercise boot camp blaring pop music  
  • He asked them if they thought it was appropriate and they ‘seemed astounded’  
  • The man filmed the group and sent the clip to the Purewa Cemetery Trust Board
  • The board manager said the exercise group was ordered to stop months ago

A mourning son has spoken of his anger after being interrupted while paying his respects to his father at a cemetery by a fitness group working out to loud music. 

The man, who wished to remain anonymous, visited the Purewa Cemetery in Auckland, New Zealand, on Tuesday to visit his dad’s resting place.

But the sacred silence was broken by a fitness group blaring loud pop music, shouting instructions and jumping up and down.  

Speaking to the New Zealand Herald, the man said the work out session should not have taken place there.

‘I go there on his birthday and the day he died every year. Suddenly I’m hearing music and these people are jumping up and down and someone yelling out, “one, two” and on further investigation I found these people having their fitness class,’ the man said. 

‘I walked up to them and asked if it was really an appropriate place to be doing what they were doing. They seemed quite astounded that someone would be upset.

‘If you saw people hooning around and driving up and down playing loud music you’d say that wouldn’t be acceptable behaviour so I don’t see why running a fitness club in a graveyard is.’         

The man decided to film the fitness group, which was made up of up to 15 people exercising outside of the chapel – just metres away from his father’s grave. 

In the video, the group can be seen squatting and jumping to the tune of ‘If I Can’t Have You’ by Shawn Mendes while an instructor shouts: ’10 seconds, push it!’ 

In the video (screenshot pictured), the group can be seen squatting and jumping to the tune of 'If I Can't Have You' by Shawn Mendes while an instructor shouts: '10 seconds, push it!'

In the video (screenshot pictured), the group can be seen squatting and jumping to the tune of ‘If I Can’t Have You’ by Shawn Mendes while an instructor shouts: ’10 seconds, push it!’

He sent the video in an email to the Purewa Cemetery Trust Board demanding that something be done about the workout group.   

Speaking to Daily Mail Australia, board general manager Alastair Crombie said the group had been ordered to stop working out at the grounds months ago.  

‘Historically, many years ago they were given permission by previous management to exercise under cover during winter but it was rescinded,’ Mr Crombie said. 

‘Four or five, maybe even six months ago even, they were told they wouldn’t be able to continue

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health

Britain’s Health Workers Face 2nd Virus Wave, but This Time With Less Support

People have also begun complaining about long wait times.

“There is some disbelief that you’ve had six months to prepare for this and why haven’t you been training more nurses,” said Dr. Tamás Szakmany, an intensive care doctor in Newport, Wales. But, he said, “it’s not just like you’ve got a car factory and you suddenly need more transmissions, so you train the factory workers to build more transmissions. It’s just not that simple.”

Among doctors and nurses, a sense of battle fatigue has set in. Extra weekend shifts that were intended to be temporary have lasted through the summer, especially in northern cities where coronavirus wards remained busy even as a national lockdown was lifted in the summer. Health workers are calling in sick, many of them with anxiety and depression.

Rapid testing remains scarce for doctors and nurses. And health workers on coronavirus wards are supplied only with basic surgical masks, not the heavier-duty N-95 masks reserved for intensive care units.

“The first time around, it’s almost like a once-in-a-lifetime kind of medical challenge,” said Paul Whitaker, a respiratory doctor in Bradford, in northern England, where the number of coronavirus patients has returned to its early May peak.

“The hospital provided packed lunches for us all,” Dr. Whitaker added. “People were sending good luck messages. But the prospect of going into another six months, which is almost certainly what it’s going to be, is relatively frightening. How are you going to maintain the morale, the focus and the energy of all these people?”

In the ex-mining and manufacturing towns in England’s north that have been hit hardest by the latest surge of infections, doctors are especially harried. Nearly 40 percent of critically ill patients are now classified as the country’s most deprived, compared to a quarter of such patients in the spring and early summer.

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health

Can You Get Covid Twice? What Reinfection Cases Really Mean

1. How many people have been reinfected?

A tracker maintained by the Dutch news agency BNO News had recorded 24 cases globally as of Oct. 16. The first confirmed case, a 33-year-old man from Hong Kong, was reported in August. He’d tested positive in March with mild symptoms of Covid-19, the disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, and had two negative tests a few weeks later. Four and a half months after the first event, he tested positive again, although he had no symptoms. The only known person to have died from a case of reinfection was an 89-year-old Dutch woman, who was also undergoing chemotherapy treatment for a rare white blood cell cancer.

2. How is a case of reinfection distinguished from a single case of prolonged illness?

To demonstrate reinfection, scientists have to isolate the microbial culprit each time, check its genetic fingerprint, and show that each infection was caused by a different strain of SARS-CoV-2.

3. Is reinfection with a virus unusual?

Not at all. Only some viruses, such as the one that causes measles, provide their victims with something close to lifelong protection against a second bout. Common viruses which, like SARS-CoV-2, cause respiratory disease — such as those responsible for colds and flu — are prevalent largely because of their ability to reinfect. A number of factors can allow for repeat infection, including an insufficient response by the immune system, waning immunity, and a mutation of the virus to the extent that people are essentially encountering the latest version for the first time.

4. What’s the reason with SARS-CoV-2?

It’s not clear, although the virus’s mutation rate has so far not raised big alarms. There are clues that infection with it does provide some immunity for some time. In one study, Rhesus macaques infected with the virus appeared to be protected against reinfection when exposed to an identical strain in the early recovery phase. A number of studies have concluded that people produce antibodies for up to 7 months after infection. However, it’s not clear that their presence is sufficient to prevent reinfection, and research has also shown that antibody levels fall off rapidly, especially for those with mild cases. In the majority of reinfections tracked by BNO News, patients had mild or no symptoms in the first instance. The time between their infections was as short as 12 days. The average was 74 days, casting doubt on U.S. President Donald Trump’s assertion, after his own bout with Covid-19, that he was “immune” for at least four months.

5. What happens in the second infection?

In 10 of the 19 cases BNO News has tracked where full details are known, the second infection produced worse symptoms than the first, and in five instances it produced serious illness. Researchers think one reason could be that on the second occasion the patient was exposed to a higher or more virulent dose of the virus. It’s unknown whether those who are reinfected can transmit the virus to others. In light

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health

U.S. Vaccine Allocation Planner for COVID-19 Launched by Ariadne Labs and Surgo Foundation

Data-driven tool will help state and county decisionmakers operationalize phased vaccine distribution to priority populations in communities across the United States

When COVID-19 vaccines become available in the United States, there won’t be enough to vaccinate everyone right away, and states will need to allocate them to their highest priority populations. A new tool provides state and county decisionmakers the region-specific data they will need to distribute vaccines to different populations based on available vaccine doses, priority populations, and vulnerable communities.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201027006116/en/

Visit the COVID-19 Vaccine Allocation Planner at https://covid19vaccineallocation.org/. (Graphic: Business Wire)

The Vaccine Allocation Planner for COVID-19 was jointly developed by Ariadne Labs, a joint center for health systems innovation at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; and Surgo Foundation, a nonprofit focused on solving health and social problems with precision.

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) recently launched a set of vaccine allocation guidelines for the United States, identifying 13 high-priority populations to be vaccinated in phases:

  • Phase 1A includes high-risk workers in health facilities and first responders.

  • Phase 1B includes people with significant comorbid conditions and people living in congregate care settings.

  • Phase 2 includes critical workers in other high-risk settings (public transit, grocery stores, etc.); teachers and school staff; people with moderate comorbid conditions; all older adults; people in homeless shelters or group homes; and incarcerated people or staff who work in jails.

  • Phase 3 includes young adults; children; and the remaining critical workers.

  • Phase 4 includes anyone residing in the United States who didn’t have access to vaccines in prior phases.

The Vaccine Allocation Planner for COVID-19 helps state and county decisionmakers operationalize the NASEM guidelines, allowing users to obtain size estimates of the high-priority populations in their immediate regions and weight purely by this criteria, while also considering other factors like community vulnerability. It also helps users estimate the number of vaccine doses available; and the percentage of vaccine coverage achievable under various scenarios.

“State and local leaders are going to need to make decisions about how to distribute their allotted COVID-19 vaccine doses, and there are many permutations those decisions could take,” said Dr. Sema Sgaier, Executive Director of Surgo Foundation and adjunct assistant professor at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. “Our tool gives them the concrete, localized data they will need to estimate with precision and maximize the public health impact of the coronavirus vaccine, while at the same time prioritizing vulnerable populations.”

“In the midst of the pandemic, we will face a scarce supply of the COVID-19 vaccines. Nations, states and local municipalities are planning for effective vaccine distribution,” said Dr. Rebecca Weintraub, Director of Vaccine Delivery at Ariadne Labs and Associate Physician, Division of Global Health Equity at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. “Unfortunately, too often scarce resources go to the most privileged. We built this tool for leaders with the data they will

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dentist

AP police rescue Hyderabad dentist from kidnappers | Hyderabad News

HYDERABAD: Andhra Pradesh police on Wednesday rescued a dentist at Anantapur from kidnappers after a hot pursuit.
Following the alert by the Telangana police regarding the movement of kidnappers’ vehicle with the victim dentist, Behjaat Hussain, who was abducted from his house in Rajendra Nagar police station limits of Telangana, was rescued. The Ananthapuram police intercepted the kidnappers’ vehicle, saved the victim and took two kidnappers into custody, whereas the other two kidnappers managed to escape.
According to Anantapur police, Dr Behjaat Hussain, a resident of Kismatpur, was kidnapped from his hospital at Kismatpur on Tuesday at 1pm by five unknown persons who were burqa clad.
Initially, the kidnappers confined him in an unidentified location in Hyderabad. The kidnappers spoke in Marathi.
However, after kidnapping Hussain, who was a faculty at a Dental college in Hyderabad and also runs a small clinic from his home at Prestige Royal Villas in Kismatpur of Rajendranagar, the offenders called his family and demanded Rs 10 crore ransom in Bitcoins.
“Hussain has inherited properties and the offenders knew it. One of the accused is a relative of Hussain,” Cyberabad police said.
“The dentist was selected as a target as he is financially sound. Kidnappers demanded 10 crore through Bitcoins. Upon intimation from Hyderabad police, while we tried to intercept them at Anantpur, they escaped towards Kanaganapalli. After surrounding from all sides, the vehicle alongwith one accused, by name Sanjay, was caught on hot pursuit, while other three ran towards nearby fields. The victim’s hands and legs were tied. He was kept in car and later rescued,” said Anantapur SP Yesubabu.
Dr Hussain said, “I resisted kidnappers at my clinic and they inflicted injuries on my hand. They took my Innova. Later, they took me to a hideout. They asked me to cooperate. They gave me water and bed to sleep. Around 2am they put me in Bolera car and tied me up.”

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health

Hospitals across 38 states report increase in coronavirus patients

The coronavirus is spreading faster than ever in the U.S., with the highest one-week average of new cases since the pandemic began. Thirty-eight states are reporting increases in the number of hospitalized patients compared to two weeks ago.



a group of people in a room: Hospital


© CBS News
Hospital

The situation is especially dire in seven states — Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Texas — where many intensive care units are near or at capacity. Average daily deaths have also edged back up to about 800 Americans per day, according to Johns Hopkins University. It’s a level not seen in more than a month.

In Utah, hospitals pushed to the brink are preparing to ration care. 

Dr. Todd Vento, the top infectious disease doctor at Intermountain Healthcare in Salt Lake City, told CBS News, “I would say that if you don’t think that your daily actions affect others that you’ve never met, you’re wrong. Everything we do that circulates the virus eventually makes it so that it might get to someone who ends up in the hospital.”

Coronavirus patients flooding hospitals as infections spread in 43 states

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In the Midwest, the surge has been especially hard. Wisconsin saw 5,262 new cases, according to state health officials, which is its highest daily uptick in cases since the pandemic began. Illinois saw 4,000 new cases, and daily deaths have risen 58.3%, the state Department of Public Health reported.

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“We have got to reverse the trend and slow the spread of this virus,” said Illinois Governor J.B. Pritzker.

COVID-19 cases in kids are also rising — up more than 14% in two weeks, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. And now, a British study suggests coronavirus antibodies might only last months — similar to those for the common cold.

The average number of new COVID-19 cases in New Jersey has jumped by more than 45% in the last two weeks. In the city of Newark, where the coronavirus positivity rate is topping more than 11%, new restrictions are in effect.

“It’s not panic. It’s calculated strategies to do what we know works here in Newark,” Dr. Mark Wade, director of the Newark Department of Health and Community Wellness, told CBS News.

Starting Tuesday night, all non-essential businesses and indoor dining in Newark will shut down at 8 p.m. until at least November 10.

Meanwhile, on the vaccine front, drugmaker Pfizer announced Tuesday that it plans to apply for emergency-use authorization from the Food and Drug Administration for its COVID-19 vaccine in November.

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